Tag: human history

How much is a petabyte infographic

How much is a petabyte infographic

whatsapetabyte

The preceding infographic, provided by the online storage site Mozy, is an intense look at all the qualities of a petabyte, which is equal to one quadrillion bytes. Quite a lot of memory, right? To put things into perspective, one single petabyte is equal to 20 million four-drawer filing cabinets filled with text, as the graphic notes. It’s also equal to 13.3 years of HD-TV video. So, how much are 1.5 petabytes equal to?  That’s the size of 10 billion photos on Facebook. When you start getting into 20 petabytes, you begin looking at crazy numbers, for 20 petabytes is the amount of data that Google processes on a single day. And get this, the total manufactured hardrive space in 1995 was equal to about 20 petabytes.  Ready for  a stat sure to shake you out of your boots? 50 petabytes, only 30 more than 20 obviously, is equal to the entire written collection of work by all of mankind (in all languages) since the dawn of civilization.  So, when you consider that Google processes 20 petabytes in a single day, it’s not inconceivable at all to think it will one day have records of every single text in human history. I mean, they are already processing more than 50 petabytes of data in a given week.

Since this graphic was created by Mozy, you might be wondering how many petabytes Mozy has stored, and the answer to that question is roughly 15 petabytes.  The graphic contains many intriguing facts, such as the fact that that worldwide datacenters now annually consume as much energy as Sweden. Hardrives are getting larger and larger, but they remain affordable because the price of them continues to go down. In 2007, Hitachi announced the world’s first terabyte hard drive which holds 1000 Gigabytes.  One company, Colossal storage, predicts that it will have a 1.2 petabyte hard drive on the market in the next 2-5 years.  Ok, let’s jump into the grading portion.

Design: A-

The graphic doesn’t rely on fancy gimmicks–it goes for elegant simplicity, and it delivers.  The graphic’s plain yet visually appealing color scheme shows in many ways how less is more.

Content: A-

I am giving the content high marks as well.  A top-notch research job by Mozy.  A superb collection of facts. A cool, silicon avatar. Overall, a very impressive graphic.

Google By the Numbers Infographic

Google By the Numbers Infographic

google-by-the-numbers

Just how massive is Google (in real terms) you ask? More specifically, how many pages are in its index?  That is the question this aesthetically pleasing infographic attempts to answer. Even though the precise number of pages in Google’s index is a closely-guarded secret, this graphic relies on math to make an educated guess at the exact number.  And that number is..(drumroll please) 40 billion.

That’s quite a lot of pages if I do say so. Google is 1,600 times the size of what it was when it began.  According to the graphic, if you were some insane loon who felt the need to display all of Google’s indexed sites on a single monitor, the screen would have to be 6 million miles from corner to corner.  So, get cracking.  It should only take you about 150 years to build such a monitor.

The graphic covers many other aspects of Google besides its index, such as gmail, youtube (which it acquired in 2006), the business side of Google, and other “stuff” (ie. random facts).  Among the fascinating tidbits, gmail’s current storage allowance is equivalent to 1.74 billion full audio CDs. Another intriguing piece of info: because there are 1.5 billion images in Google, you would need 112 million floppy disks if you wanted to store them all.  Now, here’s where its gets scary (but the good kind of scary).  Google hopes to  index about 100 petabytes of information in the near future, which is equal to half of all printed material in human history.

Now, let’s delve into the grading segment.

Design: A-

This graphic’s design is fast and furious. Barely gasping for breath, the graphic sucks you in and never lets go.  A nice color scheme coupled with compelling images and charts makes this creation extremely well-done.

Content: B+

The content side contains many unique facts–not run of the mill items either.  Interesting tidbits that make you stop and say, “whoa, that’s amazing” flow throughout. There is one mark against this graphic from a content perspective, hampering it from breaking the B+ barrier.  The creator must learn the difference between revenue and profit.  The youtube portion presents a chart that says, “No revenue.”  What they actually mean to say is “No profit,” considering the graphic just discussed that youtube does in fact generate revenue, but only from 14% of its 1 billion videos each day.

Overall, I was impressed by this work. One policy that Google must change though: they ought to allow cats on site, not just dogs.  It’s an  interesting policy decision because usually it’s the other way around.

Graphic courtesy of computerschool.org

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