Tag: hospitals

Technology and Medicine Infographic

Technology and Medicine Infographic

TechMedIndustry

This extremely attractive infographic address how technology has changed the medical industry.  It starts off by stating “medical technology is the application of devices, procedures, and knowledge for diagnosing and treating disease for the purpose of maintaining, promoting, and restoring wellness while improving the quality of life.”  On the left of the entire infographic is a timeline of technological advances in the medical industry, starting with the invention of the stethoscope in 1816 and ending with the production of the first commercial hybrid PET/MRI scanner in 2008.  Check out the entire timeline for the whole scoop.

US Med Tech Companies By Segment

A pie chart shows us that a great many medical technology companies are focused on therapeutic devices, while the next biggest segment belongs to non-imaging diagnostics.  The next largest segment is dedicated to research and other equipment, and the next segment (second to the smallest) is dedicated to imaging.  The smallest segment is designated as “Other.”  In the therapeutic devices category, the largest piece of that piece of the pie goes to cardiovascular and vascular developments, and the smallest to urology/pelvic with many other therapeutic devices in between.

3 Ways Medical Technology Has Improved Treatment Processes

1. Faster Diagnosis

2. Less Invasive Treatments

3. Shorter Hospital Stays

Survival Rate

It is noted that the survival curve has flattened because of lower mortality and has become increasingly vertical with older people because of the technological advances.  A graph shows the percentage of people who lived until a certain age between 1900 and 1902, when only about 10% of people lived past the age of 85, and 2002, when almost 30% of people lived past the age of 85.  Based on this graph, most people live to age 55 or older, and around 50% of people live to at least age 80.

Advances in Medical Technology

Some of the advances mentioned are wireless heart monitors, skin cell guns, the STEM microscope, Nexagon healing gel, Berkeley Bionics’ eLEGS, and the iPhone Blood Pressure Monitor.  A description of each of these advances is included on the infographic.

Advancements in Health Record Technology and More

Sprint has something called M2M healthcare initiative that provides GPS tracking for patients with Alzheimer’s and dementia, and offers faster access to more unified personal data like heath records and test results.  Now there is also a “know before you go” option for hospital emergency rooms.  Some hospitals place their wait times on billboards, make them available on their website, and even offer the wait time via text.  Some hospitals participate in a service called InQuick ER where a patient can pay a $9.99 fee and hold a place in the ER online.

Helpful Healthcare Apps

Some of the apps listed are My Medical, which allows you to store medical histories for you and your whole family, BP Buddy, that helps you track your blood pressure levels, Glucose Buddy, which helps you manage diabetes, and iTriage, that is a diagnostic tool.  Also listed is the Ovulation Calendar – guess what that does?  Also, the Mediquations Medical Calculator brings 231 medical calculations and scoring tools right to your mobile device.

Scorecard

Design:  A

Like I mentioned before, this is a very attractive infographic.  It manages to get a lot of information across in a way that does not confuse you or frustrate you, and the colors used are easy on the eyes.

Information:  A

The information given is complete and well-researched.

Source:  SmallCellLungCancer.net

Doctor’s Tech Toolbox Infographic

Doctor’s Tech Toolbox Infographic

DoctorsToolboxLrg

This infographic talks about modernization of health IT systems, and how $19 billion was allocated to expedite the health IT systems under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.  It goes on to talk about spending technology-wise, and how technology is being used in the healthcare system.  It is not only an interesting bit of information about the healthcare system, but an interesting look at what types of gadgets doctors prefer to do their jobs.  The infographic informs us that US hospital spending on IT systems will be $4.7 billion by the end of this year, and will grow to $6.8 billion by the end of 2014.

The Gadgets

The majority of doctors prefer an iPad.  It doesn’t really say what the doctors use the iPads for, and I’m going to go ahead and assume it’s for work.  79% prefer the iPad.  75% of US physicians have purchased an Apple-based product, and that 38% of doctors plan to buy an iPad within a year.  Some of this must be for personal use, considering the next bit of information.

At the Point of Care

This tells us that 40% of physicians use a digital device at the point of care.  So of those 75% of physicians who have bought an iPad… Oh well.  2 in 5 doctors go online during a consultation, often on a handheld device.  The information accessed is usually drug reference, online journals, disease associations, or support groups for patients.

The Convenience of Mobile

This tells you something.  63% of the physicians are using a mobile device that is not supported by their practice in order to find mobile health solutions.  94% of physicians use consulting apps.  I suppose some practices provide mobile devices for their doctors.  The top three things physicians are interested in using mobile technology for are:  electronic medical records, prescriptions, and hospital monitoring of patients.  Mobile monitoring devices are expected to rise in demand – from a $7.7 billion dollar spend to $43 billion in 2011.  43% of the medical apps created are specifically made for health professionals.

Apps for Doctors and Nurses

This gives a brief description of 4 different apps that are used by medical professionals.  They include something that lets you look at the heart from any angle, and something that lets doctors take up-close photos of a patient’s skin.

Social Media

2/3 of physicians are using social media in their profession.  In the social media word, there are 1,188 hospitals, 548 YouTube Channels, 1018 Facebook pages, 788 Twitter accounts, 458 LinkedIn accounts, 913 FourSquare accounts, and 137 blogs.  50% of all doctors say they are influenced by user-generated content.

Design:  B+

The colors are a bit dull, but the graphics are good and the type is easy to read.

Information:  A

All very useful information about how social media and technology are changing healthcare.

Source:  Spina bifida at spinabifidainfo.com

 

What to be a Nurse? Infographic

What to be a Nurse? Infographic

This infographic hits close to home. No, I’m not a nurse and I don’t play one on TV, but I wife is a nurse, both in the operating room and in the office so I have seen what the field of nursing can bring to someone’s life. It brings a great sense of fulfillment, but can also bring high stress and a lot of anxiety. It is a tough job and you can burn out if you aren’t careful. Other than teachers, I can’t think of many jobs where people are as underpaid as nurses, but I digress…

“Hello Nurse” takes a graphic look at what it’s like to be a nurse and what it takes to become one. It starts out at the top of the infographic with a very clever idea, a decision flow chart which asks questions to help you make your choice about about possible becoming a nurse. Of course it’s simplistic, it is an infographic after all but I respect the idea and with the space they have, the designer did a nice job fitting in a lot of questions that many people considering nursing would probably want answers to.

More helpful information about where nurses work (mostly hospitals and doctor’s offices), where potential growth is in the field of nursing, what type of tasks nurses perform and my favorite, where are nurses happiest in their chosen lie of work, are all found in this infographic on nursing. Nurses are happiest, surprisingly so, educating other nurses, not dealing with patients, but that is a close second.

And women still dominate the profession of nursing: there are 19 women for every one male nurse. Sounds like a great career to meet women with similar interests to me.

I’m not sure about the color palette, or lack of a color palette. The designer has chosen a primarily black and white theme, which is odd considering this is a visual medium and information usually does better when colors are used. Color helps keep interest and can act as a guide. Using only shades of gray doesn’t call anything out and gives it a “government flavor,” which isn’t a good thing. The only color exists at the top and the color images used are a bit confusing. Nurse can’t prescribe medicine for the most part, rarely give shots and don’t doctors and bank tellers give out lollipops? The choice of typeface is excellent. A condensed font that allows for good readability. The font also takes of up less space to allow a natural amount of white space for the eye to follow the decision flow chart.

The information is healthy and robust, but the graphic design could use a few days in the design hospital.

Design: C+

I felt the black and white palette was cop-out rather than a smart design choice. I did really like the decision flow chart, great idea.

Information: A-

All the really important “black and white” facts for initial consideration for being a nurse. Helpful questions and answers were all relevant to this decision.

Via:Master-Degree-Online.com