Tag: federal minimum wage

Can I Afford an iPad?

Can I Afford an iPad?

The iPad will hit stores in spring 2010. While Johnny McLameperson whines about what features it’s lacking, make no mistake: he’s hawking your spot in line at the Mac store for the launch day. That being said, you’re gonna need to come up with $729 for the midrange 3G iPad. Here’s a look at what you’ll have to do to earn the scratch to get one.

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A coffee barista has to make 8,526 drinks to earn enough tips

Tip your barista for your MochaChocaLatteFrappe. They’re counting on it. On average, baristas make $1.71 per hour in tips. If they made about 20 drinks an hour, they’d have to make 8,526 drinks to earn enough tips to pay for the iPad.

The world’s fastest pizza maker, making minimum wage, has to make 15,000 pizzas

Here’s something to aim for: the world record for pizza making stands at 15 pizzas in 6 minutes (pepperoni, if you were wondering). At this pizza-making rate, a student making the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour would have to make 15,083 pizzas to earn enough money to pay for an iPad.

A waitress at a casual dining restaurant has to serve 211 two-tops to earn enough tips

The average check at a casual dining restaurant is around $23 for a party of 2. With 15 percent gratuity, a waiter or waitress would have to serve 211 tables of two to make enough money in tips to pay for an iPad.

A mason has to lay 4,950 bricks.

A mason can lay, on average, 1,200 bricks per day. With an average hourly wage of $21.74, he’d have to lay 4,950 bricks to earn enough money to pay for an iPad. That’s just four days’ work.

Steve Jobs has to move iPhones for 52 minutes.

You know what there isn’t an app for? Being a mega-bazillionare. In 2009 Apple moved 4,363,000 iPhones. In that same year Steve Jobs made $7.3 million. That’s about $1.65 for every iPhone sold. So to buy himself an iPad (though he doesn’t have to, you know, because he made it) Steve Jobs would have to move 484 phones, which he’d do in about 52 minutes.

Peyton Manning has to pass a football 8.4 inches.

Peyton Manning makes $14 million per year. Super Bowl notwithstanding, in the 2009 regular season he completed 4,500 passing yards (totaling 162,000 inches). If you divide his salary by the number of passing inches, he would need to pass the ball a little more than 8.4 inches to make $729. And just in case you’re wondering, a football is 11” long.

Bill Gates’ heart has to beat 10.5 times.

Bill Gates might be a PC, but he’s laughing about the commercials… all the way to the bank. Last year he made an estimated $2.64 billion (or $83.65/second). What else happens in a second? Well for starters, the average human heart beats 1.2 times. Bill Gates’ heart only has to beat 10.5 times to make enough money to buy an iPad.

Will Smith needs to make .2 seconds of a movie

Will Smith made $45 million off the movies “Hancock” and “7 Pounds.” These movies had a combined run time of 190 minutes (3 hours, 10 minutes). That means he made $3.95/millisecond. He’d make enough money for an iPad .2 seconds into either movie. Is that even possible? Maybe he’ll buy us one too.

Created by Chip Trout

The Federal Minimum Wage: What’s Next?

The Federal Minimum Wage: What’s Next?

Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), workers in the United States must be paid at least a minimum wage — currently set at $7.25 an hour. While states and municipalities have the power to establish higher wages — for example, Washington is $9.32 and San Francisco is $10.74 — the federal minimum wage creates a base level for most employees. The only exceptions to the rule are certain tipped employees, full-time students, youth workers and disabled workers.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1.6 million hourly workers earned the federal minimum wage in 2012, with nearly 2 million more earning less than the minimum because they fell under one of the above exemptions. More than half of minimum wage employees work in the leisure and hospitality industry, followed by retail, education and health services.

How did we get to today’s rate of $7.25 an hour?Let’s take a closer look at the history of the minimum wage.

infographic-minimum-wage

Infographic Review

Infographic Design: B+

If there is one thing that I love about an infographic, it is when they have good organization. That means that the information is laid out in an easy to read and follow design. This infographic uses a timeline design to help guide the reader through all of the information. The years are clearly labeled and designed to standout from the rest of the text. My only negative is that the top part is a little dull and should be more appealing to the eye to attract readers.

Infographic Information: B+

The information is interesting and helps shows how the federal minimum wage has changed over the years. I like the historical facts about the minimum wage. My pet peeve about infographics is that they should provide something valuable to the reader. This infographic shares facts but provides nothing for the reader to take away from the infographic.

Infographic provided by HRdirect.