Tag: co2 emissions

Green through the Ages Infographic

Green through the Ages Infographic

green-infographic

Ah, the color green. So many meanings. Many famous items and places in history and fiction revolve around the color green, so I can certainly understand the creator’s desire to make an infographic that examines this color in detail. The purpose of this graphic is to show how green has shaped our lives throughout history, and then tie that into recycling.  The interesting thing about the facts in this graphic is that, apparently, the first recycling efforts happened in 400 B.C.  I bet you were not aware of that one?

Several hundred years after that a fellow by the name of John Heywood suggested that the moon was made out of cheese, green cheese to be exact.  And the people in that day actually believed him.  A hodgepodge of other facts are also displayed in the graphic, such as the fact that 76% of Americans call themselves environmentalists according to a 1990 poll.  Here’s another statistic relevant to today: in 1979, Alan Freeman constructed the first solar powered car.  These days, electric cars like Tesla and the Chevy Volt are all the rage, so it’s interesting to see that 30 years ago, Americans were briefly enamored by the concept of a solar car.  It’s too bad it never got off the ground.

At the bottom of the graphic, San Diego State plugs its environmental efforts and then reminds people of its third annual green event (which happened at the end of August), Blue is the New Green: Water in the Built Environment.

Design: A-

This graphic does everything that a graphic should: it catches your eye right away and draws you in.  The chronological order of events is displayed in a way that flows, so the graphic is well-done. This is a very pleasant graphic to look at.

Content: C+

This graphic has some potential theme issues, meaning, it’s unclear what the specific theme of the graphic is. Is it about the color green? Is it about the environment? With a graphic title like “Green through the ages,” someone who sees the graphic at first glance might not have any idea. That’s a potential problem, and not one that the creator of this graphic should take lightly. But the problem runs deeper.  The green timeline stops after 1990.  Why?  1990 was 20 years ago.  Surely the history of green, especially as it relates to the environment, had some events occur over the past 20 years of note.  Didn’t it?

Overall, a nice effort on this graphic.

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Conquest is a printing company with an environmentally friendly aim, choose green printing.

U.S. Hunger and Obesity Infographic

U.S. Hunger and Obesity Infographic

world hunger graphic

How are hunger, poverty, obesity, food insecurity and food stamps connected? That’s the question this complex infographic attempts to answer, and its creator leveraged data from the U.S. Census Bureau, the CDC, and the USDA to reach her conclusions.  Anne Mai Bertelsen, the creator of this graphic, is the leader of MAi Strategies and Principal at Causeshift.  She created this chart to send a strong message that America needs a Hunger Data Consortium.

Why?  Consider, argues Bertelsen, that our best data on U.S. hunger is over two years old.  And when you acknowledge that over 49 million Americans suffer from hunger (or  “food insecurity”), and over 17 million of those are children, you can understand why a consortium is needed.  Despite decades of government programs and outreach from private citizens, hunger has actually increased over the past 20 years, which is why President Obama called on every American to help in his quest to eradicate childhood hunger in America by the year 2015.

But that’s unlikely to happen at the current pace.  That’s because the data presently available is scattered, fragmented, and only available to professional researchers and policy makers, not the average Joe on the street.  How can we collectively solve the national hunger problem if the average U.S. citizen can’t even look at the (antiquated) data?

The above infographic doesn’t answer questions, and it’s not supposed to.  It simply can’t–not with data behind hunger missing and incomplete.  The graphic indicates that states with heightened levels of food insecurity also tend to have high rates of obesity.  It shows that 14 states have higher than the national average rate of both food insecurity and obesity.  Looking for a link between the two?  You won’t find it.  Not until a hunger consortium is brought about so that all interested parties can have access to data.   When they do, they’ll be able to perform a proper analysis, and as a nation, we’ll be closer to solving the national hunger and obesity crises.

Infographics Scorecard

Design: B

Oval shaped designs draw you in, and the artist did an adequate job of that.  The graphic catches your attention and fills you with an urge to make sense of it all.

Content: B-

I regretfully have to assign a B- to the content portion of my grading for one simple reason: this graphic makes your brain hurt (and perhaps it’s supposed to.)  At first glance, you can’t make heads or tails of it, and no infographic should be byzantine.  The point of an infographic is to make things simpler.  In the artist’s fairness, this is a complicated issue with no clear-cut answers to the questions presented by the graphic.  So maybe it isn’t simple for a reason:  there’s no simple solution to the obesity and hunger crises.

Infograhic provided by: Anne Mai Bertelsen and Causeshift.com

Shocking CO2 Emissions Infographic

Shocking CO2 Emissions Infographic

China’s population is significantly larger than that of the United States.  Now, you might think, based on this, that it would emit substantially more carbon dioxide than the U.S., but does it?  Well, even though China has 1,338,410,002 inhabitants compared to our 309,636,137 inhabitants, it only emits about 400,00 more tonnes of CO2 than the U.S., as the below infographic supplied by Fly.co.uk demonstrates.  Americans are quite the consumption hogs, aren’t they.

The infographic below puts many carbon dioxide emission horrors on full display.  Did you know, for instance, that Westminister & the Bank of England consume enough energy to pump out 21,356 tonnes of carbon dioxide per year.  That’s the same amount of carbon dioxide that would be emitted if a car could drive to the moon and back 188 times (90 million miles).  Now, here’s a stat you probably won’t believe.  If everyone in the United States became a vegetarian for seven days, we would save about 700 megatons of greenhouse gas emissions, which is the equivalent to taking all the cars off the road in the U.S.  So, put down that hamburger! We’ve got 700 megatons of greenhouse gas to eliminate.

co2-emissions