Tag: clever idea

What to be a Nurse? Infographic

What to be a Nurse? Infographic

This infographic hits close to home. No, I’m not a nurse and I don’t play one on TV, but I wife is a nurse, both in the operating room and in the office so I have seen what the field of nursing can bring to someone’s life. It brings a great sense of fulfillment, but can also bring high stress and a lot of anxiety. It is a tough job and you can burn out if you aren’t careful. Other than teachers, I can’t think of many jobs where people are as underpaid as nurses, but I digress…

“Hello Nurse” takes a graphic look at what it’s like to be a nurse and what it takes to become one. It starts out at the top of the infographic with a very clever idea, a decision flow chart which asks questions to help you make your choice about about possible becoming a nurse. Of course it’s simplistic, it is an infographic after all but I respect the idea and with the space they have, the designer did a nice job fitting in a lot of questions that many people considering nursing would probably want answers to.

More helpful information about where nurses work (mostly hospitals and doctor’s offices), where potential growth is in the field of nursing, what type of tasks nurses perform and my favorite, where are nurses happiest in their chosen lie of work, are all found in this infographic on nursing. Nurses are happiest, surprisingly so, educating other nurses, not dealing with patients, but that is a close second.

And women still dominate the profession of nursing: there are 19 women for every one male nurse. Sounds like a great career to meet women with similar interests to me.

I’m not sure about the color palette, or lack of a color palette. The designer has chosen a primarily black and white theme, which is odd considering this is a visual medium and information usually does better when colors are used. Color helps keep interest and can act as a guide. Using only shades of gray doesn’t call anything out and gives it a “government flavor,” which isn’t a good thing. The only color exists at the top and the color images used are a bit confusing. Nurse can’t prescribe medicine for the most part, rarely give shots and don’t doctors and bank tellers give out lollipops? The choice of typeface is excellent. A condensed font that allows for good readability. The font also takes of up less space to allow a natural amount of white space for the eye to follow the decision flow chart.

The information is healthy and robust, but the graphic design could use a few days in the design hospital.

Design: C+

I felt the black and white palette was cop-out rather than a smart design choice. I did really like the decision flow chart, great idea.

Information: A-

All the really important “black and white” facts for initial consideration for being a nurse. Helpful questions and answers were all relevant to this decision.

Via:Master-Degree-Online.com

How Much Do We Really Recycle: Infographic

How Much Do We Really Recycle: Infographic

recylcing infographic

As this infographic confirms, we are, for lack of a better phrase, a “throw away” culture. That is, we do ridiculous things like dispose of seven and a half times our body weight each year. As expected, the above infographic makes a compelling case for recycling. It’s filled with tidbits that make you throw your hands up and say, “recycling is best!” That’s assuming you were on the fence of course. Most people know recycling is best; they just don’t do it out of laziness.

Some things about recycling you probably did not know but likely are not surprised by:
–Glass can be recycled over and over without ever losing its purity
–70% less energy is used to manufacture recycled paper
–The energy conserved from recycling one bottle can power a light bulb for one hour
–One recycled can of aluminum contains enough energy to power a Sony TV for three hours

Yes, there can be no argument. A world where more people recycle is the kind of world that most people should want to live in. I do have some issues with the “facts” presented at the bottom of the article though. The graphic claims that certain objects would take several thousand (or in some cases, several million) years to decompose. A Styrofoam cup, for instance, supposedly would not decompose until the year 7,500,000,000 A.D. Really? I have a hard time believing this. If you threw a Styrofoam cup in the woods, you’re telling me it would really take over a billion years for it to erode? I doubt that. What would happen in reality is that maggots and ants would eventually get on it, and it would begin to break down. When you combine the effects of animals with other elements of nature, such as rain and acid rain, the abstract theory that it would take billions of years for the cup to break down becomes even more implausible.

My basic philosophy is this: I’m all for recycling, but don’t try to scare me with inane claims about how long it takes for objects to decompose in a non-controlled, natural environment.

Infographics Scorecard

Design: B

The design meshes several elements well, and the bottom of the graphic is very aesthetically pleasing due to its use of objects.  Certain elements of the graphic are patchy though.  The “Total Individual Lifetime Disposal” circle is not necessarily easy to understand at first glance. It bogs down a bit. That portion of the graphic could have been handled better.

Content: B+

The content is well-presented, and for the most part, in an easy-to-understand way.  I would have awarded a higher grade, but as I explained earlier, I’m not buying the creator’s argument that it would take thousands and thousands of years for plastic jugs and glass bottles to decompose.  The Styrofoam cup theory makes even less sense when you factor in the temperature changes of the planet.  Think about how hot the planet will be in 7 billion years.

Overall, this graphic is very well-done but has some room for improvement.

This graphic was provided by the fine folks at recycle.co.uk

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BuySellAds Infographic

BuySellAds Infographic

Clever idea by BuySellAds, a self-promotional infographic charting the progress of BSA over the last two years. While the visual graphics are nothing to write home about, the idea behind it and the creative use of self-promotion are ideas to be appreciated. In today’s Internet, promoting your site, your self or your company can be tricky. BuySellAds has done a decent job of this with this company infographic.

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