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Green through the Ages Infographic

Filed under: All Infographics, Environment Infographics | Comments Off

green-infographic

Ah, the color green. So many meanings. Many famous items and places in history and fiction revolve around the color green, so I can certainly understand the creator’s desire to make an infographic that examines this color in detail. The purpose of this graphic is to show how green has shaped our lives throughout history, and then tie that into recycling.  The interesting thing about the facts in this graphic is that, apparently, the first recycling efforts happened in 400 B.C.  I bet you were not aware of that one?

Several hundred years after that a fellow by the name of John Heywood suggested that the moon was made out of cheese, green cheese to be exact.  And the people in that day actually believed him.  A hodgepodge of other facts are also displayed in the graphic, such as the fact that 76% of Americans call themselves environmentalists according to a 1990 poll.  Here’s another statistic relevant to today: in 1979, Alan Freeman constructed the first solar powered car.  These days, electric cars like Tesla and the Chevy Volt are all the rage, so it’s interesting to see that 30 years ago, Americans were briefly enamored by the concept of a solar car.  It’s too bad it never got off the ground.

At the bottom of the graphic, San Diego State plugs its environmental efforts and then reminds people of its third annual green event (which happened at the end of August), Blue is the New Green: Water in the Built Environment.

Design: A-

This graphic does everything that a graphic should: it catches your eye right away and draws you in.  The chronological order of events is displayed in a way that flows, so the graphic is well-done. This is a very pleasant graphic to look at.

Content: C+

This graphic has some potential theme issues, meaning, it’s unclear what the specific theme of the graphic is. Is it about the color green? Is it about the environment? With a graphic title like “Green through the ages,” someone who sees the graphic at first glance might not have any idea. That’s a potential problem, and not one that the creator of this graphic should take lightly. But the problem runs deeper.  The green timeline stops after 1990.  Why?  1990 was 20 years ago.  Surely the history of green, especially as it relates to the environment, had some events occur over the past 20 years of note.  Didn’t it?

Overall, a nice effort on this graphic.

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